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1931 Bentley 4½ Litre Supercharged    
Original 1931 Numbers
Chassis No. SM3919
Engine No. SM3923
Registration No. GX 8727

  This car - updated
Chassis No. SM3919
Engine No. MS3937
Registration No. GX 8727

(Updated with information from Dhondt Bert. - July 2012)
 
July 2012
 

"I have a question about my car. Originally it had engine no. SM3923. Can you help us to find where the original engine is, so I can make my car 'matching number' again."

 
     
     
  Source: Dhondt Bert (Owner)
Posted: Aug 01, 2012
 
     
2009
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  Source: Fotos De Carros
Posted: Oct 13, 2010
 
     
2007
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  2007, Klaus-Josef Rossfeldt from RROC archive  
     
     
  Source: RROC
Posted: May 24, 2013
 
     
2004
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  Source: Flickr, posted by user 'die26h'
Posted: May 02, 2012
 
     
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1931 Bentley 4½ Liter Kompressor Gurney Nutting, Chassis SM3919 / Motor SM3923, Ex-Duke of Leinster.

 
     
     
  Source: Madle
Posted: Jan 19, 2009
 
     
1960s
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1930 blown 4½-litre Bentley, chassis SM3919, with Vanden Plas (of England) two-seater body.
Owned by Mr. G. Sandford-Morgan, of Adelaide, South Australia in 1960s.

At the time, G. Sandford-Morgan also owned Chassis Nos. 1085 and RL3446

 
     
     
  Source: The Flying Lady, January 1970
Posted: Jun 24, 2013
 
     
 

The first 25 production Supercharged 4½ Litre cars where Chassis Nos. SM3901-SM3925, all with "smooth-case" blowers. The next 25 were Chassis Nos. MS3926-MS3950 and had "rib-case" blowers.

Production Blower Bentleys had handbrake handles made from rectangular stainless steel, whereas the five 4½ litre race cars for Tim Birkin had the "H" section handle, but were drilled for lightness.

 
     
     
  Source: Robert McLellan
Posted: Feb 20, 2008
 
     
November 1953
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EXCERPT
From article Motoring Variety in Australia (Motor Sport, Nov 1953) by G. Sangford Morgan of Adelaide, then owner of SM3919

"In 1946 I was in Sydney, keeping my eyes open for a faster vintage machine, approaching, amongst others, John Crouch, Sydney's leading dealer in interesting cars. He had, at that time, as his personal car, a superb supercharged 4½-litre Bentley, fitted with a very pretty 2/3-seater fabric body, and was achieving a number of successes in competitions with this car. I didn't imagine for a moment that he would sell it, or that I could possibly afford it if he did, but after much discussion he finally offered it to me at a price which, though high, I could just manage. So to my great joy this magnificent car became mine, both the Lambda and the original 14/40 being rapidly disposed of to meet the cost.

The car was a 1930 standard "blower," chassis number SM 3919, the whole vehicle being in very fine order and possessed of really exciting performance. It was a brute in traffic, with its very high gearing and dislike for slow idling, but once clear of traffic it was a glorious machine. The 1,000-mile trip from Sydney to Adelaide still lives very vividly in my memory, one of the highlights being a dice with one of the then new fluid-drive Chryslers being used by the Commonwealth Government. We finally passed it, with its load of M.P.s on their way to Canberra, at a joyous 105 or so, to the fury and awe of the Parliamentary committee.

The readily available maximum, in fully equipped form, was about 105, but it could be cruised effortlessly in the late 70s all day, the fuel consumption being a monotonous 10 m.p.g. whether driven sensibly or not, with the happy result that one never really felt guilty about not driving it sensibly.

It handled on loose or firm surfaces like a small car, and would, in feet, walk away from many a good car on sheer handling alone. The weight of 37 cwt. bluffed the brakes at times, and ruled against the car for sprints and hill-climbs, but I found it a useful trials car, since its great performance made it possible to pick up time and keep to schedule where a lesser car would have to resign itself to being late. (Our Australian trials are mostly in the "Road-race-in-all-but-name" class -- though not always intentionally.) The enormous fuel bill, coupled with the necessity for travelling 40 miles to work and back each day, forced me to part with the "blower," but with the greatest possible regret. I have mourned the passing of that car more than any other I've had."

 
     
     
  Source: Motor Sport magazine, November 1953
Posted: Feb 07, 2018
 
     
EARLIEST RECORD OF HISTORICAL FACTS & INFORMATION
 
Chassis No. SM3919
Engine No. SM3923
Registration No. GX 8727
Date of Delivery: Mar 1931
Type of Body: 4-seater
Coachbuilder: Gurney Nutting
Type of Car: 122
   
First Owner: LEINSTER Duke of
 
     
  More Info: Michael Hay, in his book Bentley: The Vintage Years, 1997, states: "D/7225. Engine MS 3937 ex ch. MS 3934. Rebuilt by Moss, fitted Vanden Plas replica tourer, See also note on ch. SM 3916. S/C now no. 123."  
     
     
  Posted: Mar 01, 2007  
     
 
 
 
Submit more information on this car
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Feb 19, 2018 - Info and photograph received from Dean Montgomery for his Chassis No. VA4084
Feb 17, 2018 - Info and photograph received from Lionel Burrell for his Chassis No. 110
Feb 16, 2018 - Information received from W.G.R. Smith for Registration No. UC 4000
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